3D Printing Using Zen Toolworks CNC

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Contents

Introduction

Zen Toolworks CNC Kit can not only let you use it as a milling or carving machine(subtractive manufacturing), it is also capable of letting you do 3D printing (additive manufacturing). By using a 3D printing head (Typically filament extruder and heated nozzle) with a proper control hardware and firmware, you can do 3D printing with astonishing quality with fine resolution. This wiki article will explain what you need, and how to make it happen.

ZTW Extruder and Nozzle Assembly

Zen Toolworks carries our own design of filament extruder, please see our catalog [1].

ZTW Extruder is a solid design with aluminum body for durability. It can be easily mounted onto ZTW CNC tool base. By using ZTW extruder, you can load and unload filament easily, and you can also cleanup the filament inside the extruder for maintenance.

Sanguinololu Control Board

We choose Sanguinololu board as our default control board for 3D printing on Zen Toolworks CNC. It is opensource, easy to config and operate. We carry fully assembly Sanguinololu[[2]] board if you don't want to solder all components and test it by your own.

Arduino Software Install

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Step 001

Navigate to the following link in your browser.

http://arduino.cc/en/Main/Software

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Step 002

Scroll down and choose the "Windows" download for Arduino 0023

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Step 003

Click "Windows" and the download will begin.

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Step 004

Navigate to the location of the downloaded zip file.

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Step 005

Right click the zip file and choose "extract all".

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Step 006

In the prompt window, click "Extract".

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Step 007

The extraction process will begin

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Step 008

It now shows the extracted Arduino folder. Double click this file to open.

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Step 009

Here are all the Arduino related files.


Step 010

Now, click the following link to download the Sanguinololu files needed to be added to arduino

https://dl.dropbox.com/u/4071232/ZTW_Sanguino.zip


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Step 011

Navigate to the downloaded zip folder.

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Step 012

Right click the folder and select "Extract All"

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Step 013

Click "Extract"

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Step 014

The file location will open.

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Step 015

Right click the "Sanguino" folder and select "cut" or "copy"

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Step 016

Now go back to the location of the arduino folder and double click "Arduino-0023"

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Step 017

Next, open the "hardware" folder

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Step 018

Right click in an open space and choose "paste"

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Step 019

The sanguino folder should now show up in your Arduino's hardware folder. 

The arduino software is now ready to accept your Sanguinololu electronics board. 

Now is a good time to plug your Sanguinololu board into your computer via the USB cable. The drivers should download and install correctly. 

If they do not please refer to the steps ArduinoControl 14 - 24 via the following link:

 http://wiki.zentoolworks.com/index.php/Arduino_Stepper_Motor_Control





Firmware Upload

Before we start installing a firmware onto your Sanguinololu board we need to understand a few important things. The firmware is one of the most important yet complex parts to 3D printing. There are many 

options available for different firmwares and depending on your personal machine, the settings will be different. So far, for our ZTW machines, we have had good luck with both Marlin and Sprinter firmwares.

Sprinter seems to be a bit older and is somewhat loosing popularity, but is a pretty solid firmware and fairly easy to config. Marlin seems to be more robust and is seeing more development than Sprinter. 

It also has a lot more support for added features that you may want to explore in the future like LCD display. The other thing about Marlin is it tends to deliver better print quality and smoother operations.

For these reasons, the following steps will show how to download Marlin Firmware to your ZTW Sanguinololu controller. I will be supplying you with an initial configuration used on our 7X12 machine with F8 

lead screws. Keep in mind that settings will need to be tweaked depending on your specific machine, so as this might get you close, you will most likely need to do some work getting your machine to print 

with a high level of detail.

A great calculator that can also be used to config Marlin for you is   http://daid2.mine.nu/~daid/marlin_build/


Step 001

Navigate to this link in your browser to ZTW version of Marlin

https://dl.dropbox.com/u/4071232/Marlin%2010-07-12.zip


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Step 002

Open the downloaded file location

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Step 003

Right click the zip file and choose "extract all"

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Step 004

Click "extract" when prompted

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Step 005

The file folder location should display. Note its exact location so we can navigate to it later.


Step 006

You can also save the file in another location that you will remember later.

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Step 007

Now head over to your arduino folder and open up the "arduino" application

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Step 008

If prompted, choose "Run"

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Step 009

If this message displays, click "OK" 

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Step 010

Since we downloaded an oloder version of arduino, this message will always display when running the application.ALWAYS choose "NO". 

The newer versions of arduino do not tend to work well with the sanginololu electronics yet.

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Step 011

Once the application is running, drop down the "file" tab an select "open"

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Step 012

Navigate to the previously extracted "kliment-sprinter" folder and open it up.

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Step 013

Open the "Sprinter" folder

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Step 014

Select the "Sprinter.pde" file and click "open"

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Step 015

You should now see a bunch of codes populate in the arduino application

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Step 016

Select the "tools" drop down menu

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Step 017

Hover your mouse over "board" and select "Sanguino"

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Step 018

Select the "Tools" drop down again

This time hover over "Serial Port" and choose the appropriate COM port

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Step 019

Now click the "Sketch" dropdown and select "Verify/Compile"

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Step 020

If all goes well, you should recieve a message in the lower portion of your window saying "Done Compiling"

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Step 021

Now click the "File" dropdown and select "Upload to I/O Board"

It may be necessary to click the "RESET" button on your Sanguinololu control board IMMEDIATELY AFTER clicking "upload" in the arduino software.

If you are getting an error during this step, make sure you are hitting the reset button at the correct time.

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Step 022

It may take a couple minutes, but you should eventually get a message in the lower portion of the window saying "Done Uploading"

If for some reason you get errors, please go over the steps again and be sure you followed them all correctly. 


Control User Interface

Pronterface is the name of the Control user interface that we will be using. Again there are others out there so this is just one option. The file we will be downloading here will be used again in the next phase 

for performing the slicing operations of your STL. So keep the folder in a place you will remember.

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Step 001

Navigate to this link in your browser

http://koti.kapsi.fi/~kliment/printrun/

The download should start immediately.

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Step 002

The file downloads as a zip file. Locate the location wher the file was downloaded. Right click the file and choose "EXTRACT".

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Step 003

When this window appears, select "Extract"

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Step 004

You should now be directed to this folder. This folder is important and you will use it a lot. So you may want to copy/cut this folder and place it somewher where you can find it easily.  Now, open it up.

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Step 005

These are the contents of the folder. The 2 most important files are the "Pronterface" application and the "Slic3r" folder. Pronterface is what we use to control your machine, and Slic3r is what we use to generate the Gcode from your 3D file.

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Step 006

Go ahead and double click "Pronterface" icon. Click "run" if this pops up.

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Step 007

This is "PRONTERFACE". We will now go over some of the most important features/components of this software.

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Step 008

The Port is the USB port that your Sanguinololy control board is connected to. Be sure the correct COM port is displayed in this window.

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Step 009

Once you plug your control board into your computer you will have to hit this "Connect" button to begin communication between the computer and your printer.

YOU MUST HAVE ALREADY COMPLETED THE FIRMWARE INSTALLATION PRIOR TO THESE INSTRUCTIONS BEFORE ATTEMPTING TO CONNECT OR USE PRONTERFACE.

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Step 010

These are the temperature controls. Here, you can turn the heat to your components on and off. you can also set the desired temperature in the boxes.

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Step 011

Here is where you monitor your temperatures. This will need to be closesly monitored when running your printer.

Step 012

WE WILL BE COVERING THE USAGE OF PRONTERFACE AND A SOFTWARE WALKTHROUGH IN A VIDEO TUTORIAL LATER.



Slicing Software

<u</u>Same story here. Many different options for creating the gcode needed to print from your ZTW machine. We have chosen to use Slic3r due to its ease of use and continued development and improvement. 

Please visit slic3r.org for more info on the software and for the latest version of their software.

001.jpg

Step 001

We now need to go to Slic3r's download page for windows. Click the link below to get there.

http://dl.slic3r.org/win/

Click the correct one for your computers operating system. 32 or 64 bit.

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Step 002

Open the downloaded file location.

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Step 003

Extract the zip file and you should see the location of Slic3r

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Step 004

Open the folder

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Step 005

Now open the slic3r application.


Step 006

Slic3r has a configuration wizard that may be very helpful for you to go through. I will be providing our Slic3r profile for you to use, but most

likely it will still need tweaking depending on your configuration. So the Configuration Wizard is a great place to start.


Step 007

If you want to start with our Slic3r Profile you can grab it here:

https://dl.dropbox.com/u/4071232/Slic3r-for-Marlin_10_26_12.zip

Once downloaded, extract the zip file and save to a location you will remember.

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Step 008

To load the profile, select "file" "load config" in the slic3r software. 

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Step 009

Navigate to where you saved our config file and open it. If prompted with questions about over writing your current profile come up, select Yes only if you are okay with that.


Step 010

Now that Slic3r is config'd with our profile, you should go through each and every setting and make sure it makes sense for your machine. 

Note, you will probably need to adjust the settings of Slic3r several times before you start to see nice print quality.


Step 011

You are now ready to add an STL file and export the Gcode. Then you can go into Pronterface and load the newly created gcode file and Print away.

Please see our videos fo a quick run down on this process.

Congradulations on your completion of this wiki tutorial.

Wiring

HEATED BED

wiringdiagram.jpg

Step 001

This is the Diagram we will be following throughout this process. Please keep it in mind as a reference.

It is probably a good idea to print it out and use it as a guide.

DSCN7202.jpg

Step 002

Here is the heatbed. This will be the top.

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Step 003

Locate the solder pads on the underside of the heat bed. We will only be using the two outer 

pads as they are where power will be provided to create heat.

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Step 004

Grab one of your thermistors. This is a device that will be used to measure the temperature 

of the bed.

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Step 005

We will also need a 2 wire plug harness. You will want to be sure the wire is long enough to go from the heated bed to your control board. You may need to add an extension to your harness if necessary.

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Step 006

Once you have the approximate desired length of wire, we will solder the thermistor to the other end of the two wire plug. Strip the ends to expose the wire.

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Step 007

Wrap the wire onto the thermistor ends like shown above, and solder the wire to the thermistor.

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Step 008

In approximately the center of the bed's underside, place a piece of kapton tape about 2 inches long. 

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Step 009

Now, lay the soldered thermistor and harness down on the kapton tape. Be sure the two sides of the thermistor are not making contact with one another in any way.

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Step 010

Now lay a piece3 of tape over the top of the connections and be sure the thermistor is tight against the bed.

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Step 011

Be sure and use a good size piece of tape to ensure good contact. The glass bead of the thermistor should be pressed firmly against the bed.

DSCN7217.jpg

Step 012

With the thermistor attached, we now need to attach the 12V leads to the bed. Grab 2 pieces of wire about         14 gauge and as long as necessary to reach the control board. Strip the ends to expose the wire. 

DSCN7218.jpg

Step 013

We will be soldering the wires to the two outside pads. First, apply a bit of solder to the pads and wires seperately before attaching the wires.

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Step 014

Now solder the wires in place. Be sure to make a good, solid connection.

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Step 015

Flipping the bed over, this is what we should have. 

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Step 016

Here is an image of the bed installed on the machine. This is covered in the hardware installation.

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Step 017

We now want to connect a plug to the end of the 12V power wires that we soldered on the bed. Grab one of your 4-wire connectors.

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Step 018

On the 4-wire connector, we want to twist the two pairs together as shown above. Be sure to twist the 2 wires on the left of the plug and the 2 wires on the right of the plug. Match the colors the same as shown. This will allow for the high current in the wires.

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Step 019

If youv'e got it slide a couple pieces of heat shrink over the wires before soldering.

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Step 020

Solder each pair to the wires like shown above.

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Step 021

Slide over the heat shrink and heat it up to shrink it on. You can also use elctrical tape or butt connectors if you prefer.

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Step 022

Locate your control board.

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Step 023

Mine is installed on the backof the machine.

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Step 024

Connect the hot bed's plug to the connector labeled "PWR2/BED" as shown above. Notice the green/yellow are on one side, and the red/black are on the other. 

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Step 025

Be sure to fully seat the plug in place.

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Step 026

Lastly, we want to plug in the 2-wire plug from the thermistor that we attached to the plug as shown above. Be sure to use the correct plug here, it is the one closest to the corner of the board.


STEPPER MOTORS

wiringdiagram.jpg

Step 001

This is the Diagram we will be following throughout this process. Please keep it in mind as a reference.
It is probably a good idea to print it out and use it as a guide.

DSCN7265.jpg

Step 002

This is a picture of the finished product you are looking to create in the following steps. We will be making a harness to connect the stepper plug to the control board plug. 

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Step 003

First, we want to cut out the white and black wires on the stepper plug. This will give us a bipolar stepper motor.

DSCN7272.jpg

Step 004

You will also need one of the 4-wire connectors.

DSCN7267.jpg

Step 005

All we need to do is strip and connect the 4 wires together in the following manner. For ease of instruction and many ways to perform this, I have shown above the finished product. I chose solder and heat shrink, however, butt connectors work too. Be sure and connect the colors like I have done to make it easier later. You will want to make a harness like this for each stepper motor. Be sure and make the leads long enough to work when the axis are at both of their extreme limits. You should mock it up and manually move the axis to make sure you have enough wire. Keep in mind it is better to have too much than too little.

DSCN7273.jpg

Step 006

Now plug the ends into their corresponding motors. 

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Step 007

First we will connect the X-axis plug to the board. The X-axis is the horizontal one connecting to both sides of the gantry.

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Step 008

By keeping a consistant color orientation, it will make it easier later on. Be sure to seat the plug all the way as shown above.

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Step 009

Now connect the Y-axis connector. The Y-axis is the lower one that moves the bed forward and back. Notice how I keep the green wire to the left.

DSCN7279.jpg

Step 010

Now connect the Z-axis. The Z-axis is the one that rides along the X-axis, but is vertical and moves the extruder unit up and down. I still have the green wire on the left.

DSCN7280.jpg

Step 011

And lastly, connect the E-axis. This is the extruder motor. Green to the left again. All of your stepper motors should now be connected to the control board.

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Step 012

Lastly we need to configure our stepper drivers. The best reference for how this is done can be found on the RepRap.org website.

The Driver information shown above can be found by visiting http://www.reprap.org/wiki/Sanguinololu and scrolling a little more than 3/4 of the way down the page.

We normally run our Nema 17 motors at around .4V. This value will vary a bit between setups.  You need enough current to power the steppers and not skip steps, but too much current will overheat the motors and the stepper drivers. Always pay attention to the motors temps. They will most likely get pretty warm, but if they are excessively hot then you need to turn down the current on your drivers. 

This is also a great page to learn about more detailed information on the Sanguinololu control board we are using.


Dry Run Test

Print !!!

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